Information about Killarainy

Information from O'Donovan's Field Name Books

Standard Name:
Killarainy
Irish Form of Name:
Coill a'Raithnighe
Translation:
wood of the ferns
Civil Parish:
Other Forms of the Name with authority source (if provided) in italics:
Killarainy
Coill a'Raithnighe
Killerany County Registry, 1832
Killarainy High Constable for the Barony
Killerany Inquis. Temp. Car. I
Killarany Printed Townland List from Major Browne
Killerany Quit Rent Ledger
Killarainy Robt. Martin, Esq., Ross
Killarainy Sketch Map
Killarainy The Rev. E. French, P.P. Moycullen
Killlarainy Thos. Martin, Esq., M.P.
Killarainy Tithe Applotment Book
Description:
The greatest portion of this townland contains the Danesfield Demesne and plantations. The road running from Galway to Oughterard passes through this townland. Frenchville Cottage is close to the S.E. boundary. Moycullen R.C. Chapel is a little North of Frenchville Cottage and outside the townland boundary. There is a fort.
Situation:
A central townland. Bounded on the North by Drimcong and Knockshanbally, on East by Ballydottia and Moycullen, on South by Ballycurk W. and the point of Kylebroghlan and on W. by Gurtaloughlin.

Information From Joyce's Place Names

Translation according to P. W. Joyce:
Killarah in Cavan ; church of the rath. See Rath.? Killarainy in Galway, and Killaranny in King's Co.; Coill-a'-raithnighe, wood of the ferns. See Raithneach, vol. ii. p. 330 [reproduced below].
Fern. As many of the common kinds of fern grow in this country in great abundance and luxuriance, they have, as might be expected, given names to numerous places. The simplest form of the Irish word for the fern is raith, which is used in some very old documents; but this form is wholly forgotten in the modern language, and I cannot find that it has been perpetuated in names. The nearest derivative is Rathain [rahen], which is the Irish name (as we find it in many old documents) of the parish of Rahan in King's County, well known in ecclesiastical history as the place where St. Carthach was settled before he founded his great establishment at Lismore. This name, which signifies a ferny spot, occurs in several other parts of Ireland. The Mac Sweenys had a castle at a place called Rahan near Dunkineely in Donegal, which the Four Masters call Rathain; there is a parish in Cork, near Mallow, with the same name, and several places in different counties have the names Rahin and Rahans - all meaning the same thing. The common word for the fern is raithne or raithneach [rahna], which latter form is found in Cormac's Glossary, and is used by the Irish-speaking peasantry all over the country at the present day. One of its diminutives, Raith-neachán, in the anglicised form Ranaghan (a fern-growing spot) is the name of places in each of the four provinces. All the preceding forms are further illustrated in the following names. Ardrahan, a small village in the county Galway, containing an old castle and a small portion of the ruins of a round tower, is often mentioned in the annals by the name of Ard-rathain, ferny height; and this also is the name of two townlands in Kerry, and of one near Galbally in Limerick. There are several places in different counties called Drumrahan, Drumraine, Drumrane, Drumrainy, and Drumrahnee, all signifying the ridge of the ferns.

Information From Griffith's Valution

Area in Acres, Roods and Perches:
A.R.P.
213 0 13
Land value at the time in pounds, shillings and pence:
£.s.d.
91 0 8
Building value at the time in pounds, shillings and pence:
£.s.d.
16 2 0
Total value at the time in pounds, shillings and pence:
£.s.d.
99 0 0
Heads of housholds living in the townland at this time:

Townland Information

What is a townland?:
A townland is one of the smallest land divisions in Ireland. They range in size from a few acres to thousands of acres. Many are Gaelic in origin, but some came into existence after the Norman invasion of 1169
Townland:
Killarainy is a townland.
Other placesnames in this townland:
Some other placenames in or near this townland are...

Information From Maps

Original OS map of this area.
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Ireland was first mapped in the 1840s. These original maps are available online.
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Killarainy
Original OS maps at the Ordnance Survey of Ireland website.
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Below is a link to the Ordnance Survey of Ireland website. It displays the original OS map that was created in the 1840s.
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Killarainy
Information from the Down Survey Website.
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The down survey website will tell you who owned this townland in 1641 (pre Cromwell) and in 1671 (post Cromwell).
Down Survey Website
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Information from Google Maps.
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You can use this link to find this townland on Google Maps.
Google Maps
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Information from the National Monuments Service.
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You can use this link to view a map of archaelogical features.
This link brings you to a website wherein you will have to search for your townland.
Archaeological map from the National Monuments Service

Neighbouring Townlands

List of townlands that share a border with this townland:
This is a list of townlands that share a border with this townland.

Population and Census Information

People who lived here:
You can retrieve a list of people who lived in this townland from 1827 to 1911. This list is compiled from the following resources.
  • The Tithe Applotment Books
  • Griffith's Valuation
  • 1901 Census
  • 1911 Census
List of nineteenth century and early twentieth century inhabitants of this townland.
Church records of births, deaths and marriages:
Church records of births, deaths and marriages are available online at http://www.rootsireland.ie. To search these records you will need to know the 'church parish' rather than the 'civil parish'. (The civil parish is the pre-reformation parish and was frequently used as a unit of administration in the past.)
Killarainy is in the civil parish of Moycullen.
Roman Catholic parishes:
This civil parish corresponds with the following Roman Catholic parish or parishes.
  • Moycullen
  • Spiddal
Church of Ireland parishes:
This civil parish corresponds with the following Church of Ireland parish.
  • Moycullen
In general, the civil parish and the Church of Ireland parish are the same, but, this is not always the case.

Other Sources

Information from the Logainm database.
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